Author Message
Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:08 pm    Post subject:

Adriaan wrote:
Hi Patrick,

Thanks for the nice video's, these really give my sunday's a good start.
I must say that was a good job you did there. The hive seems to be thriving despite the hivebeetles last year.

We don't have hive beetle in Belgium (yet),the closest outbreak I am aware of is in southern Italy, but apparently it is not something the bees can't handle.

Something else we don't have in Belgium is bee-inspectors. How does that work in the states? They come every year and inspect all your hives?
All we have to do is register with the food safety organisation, but many beeks don't even do that.

You mentioned that your hives have to be inspectable does that mean you can't have bees in logs or skeps like we can?

In a few hours I am off to get some young larvae from Apis melifera melifera (our local black bee) for queen rearing. I will try and get them mated with black drones through 'moonlight mating' otherwise they will hybridise immediately.

friendly greetings

Adriaan



Adriaan, it's really incredible to me still, even though we've all been on the Internet since about the 90s, that I can have these conversations with someone in Belgium.

So yes, each state is different regarding inspection/hive regulations. Florida, however, we must get inspected to make sure there's healthy brood, especially with no AFB, EFB, demeanor, etc. The hives must be inspectable, which mainly means either top bar or Langstroth, and no bad cross-comb.

But, same as there, many people don't ever report to the state.

Good luck with the black bees. I'm fascinated with the whole black bee genetics.

By the way, I picked up a swarm that moved into a lady's mailbox the other day. There seemed to be many bees that were black in their stripes (no yellow). Would many of these in the ball be considered black bees, or do you mean SOLID black? I do see solid black bees also in other colonies, but they are usually mixed in with other yellow bees in the same colony. I love mutts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBEgovfa0Pc&t=166s


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Adriaan
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 5:35 am    Post subject:

Hi Patrick,

Thanks for the nice video's, these really give my sunday's a good start.
I must say that was a good job you did there. The hive seems to be thriving despite the hivebeetles last year.

We don't have hive beetle in Belgium (yet),the closest outbreak I am aware of is in southern Italy, but apparently it is not something the bees can't handle.

Something else we don't have in Belgium is bee-inspectors. How does that work in the states? They come every year and inspect all your hives?
All we have to do is register with the food safety organisation, but many beeks don't even do that.

You mentioned that your hives have to be inspectable does that mean you can't have bees in logs or skeps like we can?

In a few hours I am off to get some young larvae from Apis melifera melifera (our local black bee) for queen rearing. I will try and get them mated with black drones through 'moonlight mating' otherwise they will hybridise immediately.

friendly greetings

Adriaan
Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:52 pm    Post subject: Delayed cutting them out of decades-old hive for a year

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I waited an entire year to cut these ladies out in my back yard.

These were bees I picked up from an old abandoned pigeon shed of which the owner said they had been in the hives for years and years.

The hives were originally his uncles, I believe he said.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhm9gU1cDas&t=98s


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Here's part 1 of the video when picked them up a year ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8zMBaViChU&t=43s

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Here's part 2 from a year ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDchbaDtlXY&t=109s


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