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Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 6:19 pm    Post subject:

Barbara wrote:
And you cannot see what is going on inside a brick wall to know how much stores they have and how long they have been there.....
I think this is the major problem here, trying to trap them out too early because there is plenty of brood but not enough stores to sustain them and then you stop the flow of stores into the hive and those larvae are starving by the time they hatch and try to crawl out.

Have you ever encountered situations like this?

.. but would be very happy if you have some input Patrick ....


Barbara, what probably happened in those particular cases you described is that the colony was very weak to begin with inside the original structure.

But what I always do now is place a frame with significant nectar/pollen/brood/eggs/larvae at the very beginning of the setup. I know sometimes that's easier said than done depending on the hives you have at home and how much they are able to give up at that particular time.

I think that's the most important thing you can do to ensure it gets off on the right footing.

Another option is bringing a hive you already have to the location which may be viable but is struggling due to low population. They'll be glad to merge with new teammates because they all need each other.

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Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 6:12 pm    Post subject:

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Here's the update on the trap-out:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7RyMEEvVs0



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Barbara
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:32 am    Post subject:

I just found it so upsetting with the trap outs I have done that failed, aside from the huge amount of time invested, seeing bees dying as a result of your best efforts really hurts. I felt like they might have had a more merciful death by being sprayed. Seeing bees littering the ground under the cone too weak to walk or fly or reach the bait hive just above and crawling out of the end of the cone so weak they just drop to the ground and die is pretty demoralising when you are there trying to save bees. And you cannot see what is going on inside a brick wall to know how much stores they have and how long they have been there.....
I think this is the major problem here, trying to trap them out too early because there is plenty of brood but not enough stores to sustain them and then you stop the flow of stores into the hive and those larvae are starving by the time they hatch and try to crawl out. I may place a pipe directly into the bait hive so that they are crawling into the bait hive and can then maybe be revived by the bees in there this time, but it is then difficult to monitor how many bees go back down into the wall.
Have you ever encountered situations like this?
The first trap out I did was an old established colony and there were no issues at all but since then I have had mostly disasters. I wonder if it would be possible to set up a feeder to allow syrup to be fed into the bees in the wall but no pollen get in, so that the brood production dries up but they don't starve. Maybe a box fitted to the exterior entrance with a jar feeder on top and the cone on the front.

Apologies.... I am just using this post to bounce ideas around in my head.... sometimes writing a problem down helps you figure it out.... but would be very happy if you have some input Patrick ....
Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:58 pm    Post subject:

Barbara wrote:
And there was me thinking it was going to be a bonny pink bait box with flowers painted on it..... Rolling Eyes

......but time of year is so critical here because the season is short compared to your climate. I know the farmer and it is close by and it is early in the season, so I guess I will give it a go.


LOLOLOLOL. I hope I didn't mislead you too badly.

Anyhow Barbara, I would definitely give it a go, especially since it is rather close to you.

However, you may want to inspect the wall and adjoining areas once more before you take the plunge to make sure they don't have alternate ways back in. Sometimes there's no way to tell for sure until it's set up, however.

You only live once, and your season is short. GO FOR IT !!! And please post photos and video !!!

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Barbara
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:12 am    Post subject:

And there was me thinking it was going to be a bonny pink bait box with flowers painted on it..... Rolling Eyes

I love your comment about playing "whack a mole".... it really describes those situations well. I've just got a call to go have a look at a possible trap out in a stone farmhouse in the adjacent village. I said I wouldn't do another trap out as the last few have not been successful and either the bees starved to death because there were not enough stores in the colony to sustain them through the trap out period or someone has unknown to me sprayed them(new colonies) or the extracted colonies dwindled and died or failed to raise queens, but time of year is so critical here because the season is short compared to your climate. I know the farmer and it is close by and it is early in the season, so I guess I will give it a go.
Patrick Thomas
PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 10:06 pm    Post subject: Very Feminine looking trap-out on huge tree

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I really don't know how else to describe what is the elephant-in-the-room.

https://youtu.be/K4S3-yPChyM

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