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surprise bees in discarded warre

 
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sangje
New Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2012
Posts: 8
Location: scotland midlothian edinburgh uk

PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 7:30 am    Post subject: surprise bees in discarded warre Reply with quote

Hi any help appreciated. We very sadly stacked our warre boxes randomly (but in a tower luckily with roof and quilt on top) in the back of my garden after a good colony abandoned it from an adjoining orchard last autumn.
Just about to move house and went to move the boxes to give to a friend when to our surprise we saw pollen loaded bees going in and out of a gap between the boxes where they overlap. We have not disturbed them but are unsure what to do. Whether to carefully move them to her place more or less as they are in the night or put them in a transition box first. Advice ? Surprised
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1121
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bees! Rolling Eyes So unpredictable... Very Happy Congrats on the swarm.

I don't use Warres, but:

How many boxes are they in? It will be simpler to move them as they are, just close in with ventilation and strap boxes securely together. If only two boxes, quite straightforward; four boxes a bit more difficult. Assuming you're using top-bars as per Warre plans (as opposed to frames) moving them to a different box temporarily may cause more problems unnecessarily.

Good luck and do let us know how it goes.
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sangje
New Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2012
Posts: 8
Location: scotland midlothian edinburgh uk

PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks so much trekmate ! That reinforces our plan - we thought we would do that at the end of the week. I think they are only in the top box and they are quite small. Which throws up the next question of whether they will survive - new place and late in the season - but we have been advised to feed a lot and cross our fingers !
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1121
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If they are only in the top box it would be best to take the empties away. Less volume means less to patrol and maintain giving the colony a better chance. I had a small colony in a TBH going into last winter that I had little hope for. A reduced volume (follower boards around three combs) and they came through well and have expanded this year.
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olriley
House Bee


Joined: 23 Apr 2013
Posts: 11
Location: Grantham, Lincs, UK

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are there bars/frames in the box? If not have they presumably have built comb on the underside of the roof ... a bit more tricky to sort out.
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Adam Rose
Silver Bee


Joined: 09 Oct 2011
Posts: 577
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

trekmate wrote:
If they are only in the top box it would be best to take the empties away. Less volume means less to patrol and maintain giving the colony a better chance. I had a small colony in a TBH going into last winter that I had little hope for. A reduced volume (follower boards around three combs) and they came through well and have expanded this year.


This is one difference between TBHs and Vertical hives. Insulation, or its opposite, cold air to heat up, matters much more on top and at the sides than at the bottom. So just taking boxes away underneath won't have that much effect. In fact I think I remember Bernhard recommend using empty boxes underneath as a cold air sump in particularly cold climates.

Any insulation you can get around the box with the bees in it will help. You can attach any kind of cheap insulation around the box - polysterene, reflective stuff, all the stuff that you can get from any DIY shop. Whatever you can get without actually blocking the entrance hole.
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trekmate
Golden Bee


Joined: 30 Nov 2009
Posts: 1121
Location: UK, North Yorkshire, Bentham

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adam - fully agree with you insulation comments, but I'm referring to "maintaining a strong colony" i.e. density of bees. Mid Lothian is not generally an extreme climate, especially with climate change...
John
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sangje
New Bee


Joined: 12 Jul 2012
Posts: 8
Location: scotland midlothian edinburgh uk

PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 3:55 pm    Post subject: surprise bees in discarded warre Reply with quote

Hi thanks everyone - yes there are bars in the top two boxes - i think as you say we will remove the bottom/surplus ones and insulate like crazy -thank you all - will let you know how it goes.
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