Please support Friends of the Bees to keep this forum free to use.

Natural Beekeeping International Forum
low-cost, low-impact, balanced beekeeping for everyone

 Forum FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileYour Profile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please Read The Rules before posting.



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)
Queen cells

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Orange65
New Bee


Joined: 22 Mar 2018
Posts: 9
Location: Sandy Bedfordshire UK

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 5:14 pm    Post subject: Queen cells Reply with quote

New beekeeper with 2 second hand nationals , had them since early March both hives thriving. Im looking to move on to Top Bar , but for now just getting to grips with what I have.
Today did second proper inspection, did my first just over a week ago.
On one hive today I couldnt see the queen....and lo and behold I have 4 queen cells literally mirror imaging each other either side of the frame at the bottom.
Could it be a supecedure or emergency cell?? All I can say is that all are at the bottom in the centre all hanging straight down

The queen may still be there but im unsure what to do next, I do have a brand new national waiting in the wings, and im trying to go foundationless.

Any advice please..many thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1745
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

How strong is the population in this hive? Is it a single brood box or a brood box and super? Is the hive chock a block with brood and honey and teaming with bees or is there some empty comb and quite sparse. Did you see eggs and young larvae during the inspection? How big were the queen cells and were they laid into and or capped? Were they more spherical like play cups or elongated into proper queen cells? Do you have Oil Seed Rape in bloom near you? That can really boost a colony and promote early swarming. Did you see any drone brood and are there drones flying?
When you did the first inspection, did you keep the combs over the hive when you were examining them. It is one of the most important things to remember because if you drop the queen out of the hive, she will be unable to get back..... she is unable to fly whilst she is in lay.

Without seeing the queen cells and the colony strength it is difficult to advise on what might be happening or what to do but hopefully answers to the above questions will shed more light on the situation. If in doubt it is usually better to do nothing as the bees have much more idea of what needs to be done than the beekeeper.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Orange65
New Bee


Joined: 22 Mar 2018
Posts: 9
Location: Sandy Bedfordshire UK

PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2018 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Barbara,
Single brood............relatively full good stores and brood.
The queen cells are capped and elongated.
I plan to check on Weds....thanks for your thoughts
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Barbara
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 1745
Location: England/Co.Durham/Ebchester

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like they might be swarm cells in that case and if they are capped you may have a swarm imminent or probably lost one by now. The swarm will usually leave as the first queen cells are capped. In fact that may be why you didn't see the queen. Coming out of winter in just a single brood box is going to allow things to get cramped pretty quickly and if you have some mild weather and. Oil Seed Rape that can really accelerate brood production and colony build up. Did you see any eggs or drones during the inspection? I don't think I got a reply to those questions. Do you have any supers to put on these hives? If so, I would either put a super on the other hive to buy you some time or start whichever transfer process I suggested in my post on your other thread about transfer at the earliest opportunity.
I am right in thinking that it was you who was wanting to transfer these bees to TBHs aren't I?
Have you got your TBHs set up to attract a swarm .... a small area of about 8 bars at the front of the hive sectioned off by a follower and ideally a bit of old brood comb hung in there can really increase your chances of baiting a swarm into it?
I assumed your colonies were on National brood and a half (ie brood box and a super) over winter as that is the norm and would have given them longer to build up before reaching swarming capacity.

Time is of the essence now if I am right as that hive may throw another swarm or two within the next 10 days..... knowing about whether there were eggs and drones would help clarify the situation a little better.... photos of the inspection and general colony strength would have been much more helpful.... just for future reference. It's very difficult to assess the condition/status of a hive from someone's response to a few questions especially as that can be based on their perspective or interpretation. Your weather conditions will also be somewhat ahead of mine here which makes a difference and if there is rape nearby that just moves the goal posts completely.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Orange65
New Bee


Joined: 22 Mar 2018
Posts: 9
Location: Sandy Bedfordshire UK

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Barbara

I have supers to put on tomorrow, and im also hoping to buy a TBH tomorrow.

Didnt see any eggs , but there were drone cells. Both my hives are just on abrood box...supers being added tomorrow

Thanks for your input
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    beekeeping forum -> Beginners start here All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

SPECIAL OFFER FOR UK FORUM MEMBERS - Buy your protective clothing here and get a special 15% discount! (use the code BAREFOOTBEEKEEPER at checkout and be sure to 'update basket')



Are the big energy companies bleeding you dry?


Is way too much of your hard-earned family income going up in smoke?

Are you worried about what could happen if the ageing grid system fails?

You need to watch this short video NOW to find out how YOU can cut your energy bills TO THE BONE within 30 days!

WATCH THE VIDEO NOW



(country selected automatically - UK/USA/CA/AU)

Conserving wild bees

Research suggests that bumble bee boxes have a very low success rate in actually attracting bees into them. We find that if you create an environment where first of all you can attract mice inside, such as a pile of stones, a drystone wall, paving slabs with intentionally made cavities underneath, this will increase the success rate.

Most bumble bee species need a dry space about the size a football, with a narrow entrance tunnel approximately 2cm in diameter and 20 cm long. Most species nest underground along the base of a linear feature such as a hedge or wall. Sites need to be sheltered and out of direct sunlight.

There is a spectacular display of wild bee hotels here

More about bumblebees and solitary bees here

Information about the Tree Bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum)

Barefoot Beekeeper Podcast



Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


Now available from Lulu.com


4th Edition paperback now available from Lulu.com

See beekeeping books for details and links to ebook versions.
site map
php. BB © 2001, 2005 php. BB Group

View topic - Queen cells - Natural Beekeeping Network Forum