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harvesting/saving propolis

 
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becabwca
Guard Bee


Joined: 16 May 2008
Posts: 73
Location: UK. nr llanishen, chepstow, s.e.wales (monmouthshire)

PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 12:45 pm    Post subject: harvesting/saving propolis Reply with quote

hi

i just wondered how people who do do such things harvest propolis? do you put in some sort of stainless steel 'thing' in the hive, wait for it to be covered then remove and wash in alcohol?

also-i melted some of my first wax the other day....wasnt really a joy to do as it was from a hive completerly destroyed by wasps.....but thats another story,, anyway, having tried (and failed in this wonderful uk summer!) a solar wax melter, i used a saucepan of water & shoved it all in, filtering proves interesting and to be improved....BUT:

(if people use this water-y method) can the propolis-y water be used/saved at all?

i had quite a large pan of dark brown sludgly water but could well imagine it sitting in the fridge for a wee then going mouldy so it got thrown......i condidered putting it in a bath but hmmmm, bits of bee/wasp/larvae etc etc, not nice!

any thoughts?

beca
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nlishman
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PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 7:43 am    Post subject: harvesting/saving propolis Reply with quote

did you get anywhere with your propolis? - i've been using a solar extractor and want to know if i can do anything with the propolis-y gunk left over

thanks

nick
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Tavascarow
Silver Bee


Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 848
Location: UK Cornwall Snozzle

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2010 11:49 am    Post subject: Re: harvesting/saving propolis Reply with quote

becabwca wrote:
hi

i just wondered how people who do do such things harvest propolis? do you put in some sort of stainless steel 'thing' in the hive, wait for it to be covered then remove and wash in alcohol?

also-i melted some of my first wax the other day....wasnt really a joy to do as it was from a hive completerly destroyed by wasps.....but thats another story,, anyway, having tried (and failed in this wonderful uk summer!) a solar wax melter, i used a saucepan of water & shoved it all in, filtering proves interesting and to be improved....BUT:

(if people use this water-y method) can the propolis-y water be used/saved at all?

i had quite a large pan of dark brown sludgly water but could well imagine it sitting in the fridge for a wee then going mouldy so it got thrown......i condidered putting it in a bath but hmmmm, bits of bee/wasp/larvae etc etc, not nice!

any thoughts?

beca
I use a similar method but I wrap the comb in muslin or tie it in a jelly bag with a rock to weight it down.
Then when I bring the water to the boil the wax separates & when I leave it to cool hardens on the surface.
The remains in the bag I dry out & use for firelighters in the winter.
Always thrown the water away.
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Owes
New Bee


Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 6
Location: UK, Wales

PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 1:31 pm    Post subject: filtering wax Reply with quote

hello

when i filter wax, i usually melt it down then pour into an ice cream tub as a mould, let it solidify then put it in an old pair of tights (this first step just makes it easier to put in the tights), which i then put into a saucepan with water and vinegar. The vinegar helps to dissolve bits of bee body and helps to consolidate the rest of the rubbish. alot of the rubbish will be left in the tights, but any finer stuff will be found on the bottom of the wax after it has solidified, which can easily be scraped off. you can repeat this method (excluding the tights) to get even more crud out.

also when melting the wax i put it in a saucepan which is within another saucepan with water in it, (like when melting chocolate) this reduces the chance of me burning the house down, which would be embarrassing

Owen
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Grad1991
New Bee


Joined: 31 Jan 2011
Posts: 5
Location: USA - Indiana - Indianapolis

PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2011 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never tried using vinegar before. I'll have to give that a shot. I use store-bought stuff and I always get some sediment left over. Thanks for the info!
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bilbehr
Silver Bee


Joined: 24 Jan 2010
Posts: 531
Location: USA, South Georgia, Albany

PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:27 am    Post subject: propolis harvest Reply with quote

As to harvesting propolis, Phil somewhere on the site mentions putting a cloth in the hive which is covered with propolis, taken out and froaen, and the propolis cracks off. Have you listened to the latest podcast on propolis? Very interesting.

beekeeping forum -> Bee products, bee plants and apitherapy -> propolis

Bill
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milapostol
New Bee


Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Location: Berkeley, CA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does anyone know how to make a tincture with alcohol? I put some scraped propolis in some organic vodka, but nothing seems to be happening.

Do I have to melt the propolis first?

Thank you.
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StillGed
House Bee


Joined: 09 Mar 2011
Posts: 17
Location: USA, CA, South Bay Area

PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most organic material can be extracted using alcohol, but resins (including propolis) are a slightly different matter.

Turpentine is what has been traditionally used to dissolve resins into a liquid, though I wouldn't drink the stuff (if that's your intention for a tincture). If you want to take a propolis tincture orally, the traditional method is to use a higher proof alcohol. Vodka is only 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume or ABV); you'd want to use 150 proof (75% ABV) or higher. In the US, that's Everclear or Bacardi 151.

-S.
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milapostol
New Bee


Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Location: Berkeley, CA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

StillGed,
Thank you for that answer. I've asked this question before, and no one's been able to give me an answer until now.

Best wishes,
Mil
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StillGed
House Bee


Joined: 09 Mar 2011
Posts: 17
Location: USA, CA, South Bay Area

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're welcome, Mil.

A more involved discussion may be found here: http://www.fao.org/docrep/w0076e/w0076e14.htm
There's a list of six methods for small-scale processing of propolis about halfway down the page, and the first one is extraction in ethanol.

I just stumbled across it while thinking about toothpaste.

-S.
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milapostol
New Bee


Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 4
Location: Berkeley, CA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 3:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

StillGed wrote:
I just stumbled across it while thinking about toothpaste.


Had to grin when I read that. How did you get from toothpaste to propolis? Smile
Thanks again for the link. It's bookmarked so I may sally forth into the world of propolis tinctures.

Best wishes,
Mil
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 2601
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually you can buy commercially produced propolis toothpaste in Germany and I'm using it for years. To me the toothpaste doesn't make much difference to other toothpastes except I don't like the fluor (which is quite poisonous) in other toothpastes. If you want to keep your teeth healthy, stop eating sugar. In opposite to common belief teeth are not broken down externally, but from within by the body in the case of malnutrition. Malnutrition is triggered by overuse of white sugars and unnatural fats, which act as "anti-nutritions", which means those actually block the digestions of nutrions in the guts. Even if you eat a lot of healthy stuff, the body can't use it. Because essentials are needed, the body eats up the reserves. Teeths are reserves, especially for calcium. See the book: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price, ISBN: 978-0879838164 for details.

The link above is wrong in saying 95% alcohol is best to use for propolis extraction. Because part of it dissolves in water and fat, the 75% alcohol is best, because it extracts the alcohol- as well as the water-binding indrigents out of the propolis.

The best use of raw propolis is to munch it with a spoon of peanut butter and flush it with some vodka (or similiar). The peanut butter's oils draws out a lot of the propolis and because it is bound to the fats, the body can make use of it readily.

Bernhard
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biobee
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 7445
Location: UK, England, S. Devon

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Bernhard, that's really useful info, esp. regarding dissolving propolis. Do you think there is any value in feeding an aqueous extract of propolis back to bees in syrup? This occurred to me as a possible approach to Varroa treatment, but I have never tried it.
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Guillemot
House Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2011
Posts: 12
Location: UK

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

zaunreiter wrote:
Actually you can buy commercially produced propolis toothpaste in Germany and I'm using it for years. To me the toothpaste doesn't make much difference to other toothpastes except I don't like the fluor (which is quite poisonous) in other toothpastes. If you want to keep your teeth healthy, stop eating sugar. In opposite to common belief teeth are not broken down externally, but from within by the body in the case of malnutrition. Malnutrition is triggered by overuse of white sugars and unnatural fats, which act as "anti-nutritions", which means those actually block the digestions of nutrions in the guts. Even if you eat a lot of healthy stuff, the body can't use it. Because essentials are needed, the body eats up the reserves. Teeths are reserves, especially for calcium. See the book: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price, ISBN: 978-0879838164 for details.


This excellent book by Wesotn A. Price is also available as free e-book:

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200251h.html
...................

And I have to agree that fluoride made my teeth more brittle rather than stronger! Crying or Very sad


Last edited by Guillemot on Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:18 am; edited 1 time in total
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Sir David
Scout Bee


Joined: 17 Dec 2010
Posts: 369
Location: france , angers

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As someone who lived for many years in an area with naturally fluridated water and few dentists I have wondered about the subject .( Hartlepool, Co Durham, GB )
Yes fluorine is nasty stuff but then so is chlorine and try doing without salt for a while Confused
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Guillemot
House Bee


Joined: 06 Apr 2011
Posts: 12
Location: UK

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

propolis: +++

fluoride: - - -


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ys9q1cvKGk

There are even pesticides which have fluoride as a main ingredient:

http://www.healthy-communications.com/fluoride-pesticides.htm
....................

To get rid of chlorine you can filter your wate
....................

Salt is actually not harmful for your body, especially if you use unrefined seasalt.


Last edited by Guillemot on Wed Apr 13, 2011 11:33 am; edited 1 time in total
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zaunreiter
Moderator Bee


Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 2601
Location: Germany, NorthWest

PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phil, i thought about it, too. What I thought, that some sort of artificial propolis may help. I would harvest resins straight from the trees, mix it with wax and some essentials - to paint the hive with it from inside or as a door mat the bees walk over, thus distribute it through the hive.

Still in the thinking status, may give it a try later.

Bernhard
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jeffdavies
New Bee


Joined: 09 May 2008
Posts: 1
Location: Llanelli, South Wales

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:11 pm    Post subject: Making Propolis Tincture Reply with quote

Hi, I am very interested in making my own Propolis Tincture.

I appreciate that it can be purchased from Health Stores but at £5 a time, can prove expensive.

I have tried a few methods such as using Vodka but not very successfully
as it doesn't put the Proplolis into solution properly.

Ethanol is suggested but has anyone used another non-toxic solvent?

Propolis is a very powerful antibiotic and I have used it to kill off mouth ulcers within 24 hours.

I look forward to suggestions/recipes etc.

Many thanks
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Mushgirl
New Bee


Joined: 31 Mar 2012
Posts: 4
Location: Denver, CO USA

PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We use a propolis toothpaste as well. I have a few medical issues that make my gums bleed and the propolis has completely stopped that. I am looking forward to making my own if I can figure out how to collect it. The toothpaste I use has propolis extract, clove oil, baking soda, and tea tree oil. It doesn't taste great, but it doesn't taste bad either, and my mouth seems a lot healthier. I agree fluoride is really bad. I haven't used any oral care products with it for years.
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medenapita
New Bee


Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Posts: 2
Location: Bulgaria, Yambol region

PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 11:29 am    Post subject: propolis tincture Reply with quote

This is the traditional Bulgarian recipe for Propolis tincture / cut the propolis into small flakes and put into rakia (this is the Bulgarian homemade brandy from grapes or plums) for 100ml of rakia use about 1cm cube. Leave this in a dark cool place shaking everyday for 20 days.
This works very well diluted in water as you use it, as a mouthwash. I have also had big reief from pain in the teeth from wisdom teeth and exposed nerves from wedging a chunk of propolis in the hole, like the bees do. Usually I leave this overnight, clean it the next day, reaply a few times and the problem is solved. I thought in one moment I would have to have a very painful tooth pulled out but the propolis helped greatly and the tooth is still in my mouth and no pain.

As for harvesting the propolis we find with our bees that they use a lot around the cloth that sits over the frames in a standard hive and around where the frames sit. We usually harvest from there as we feel they have a reason to place all of this propolis but especially in walls , corners and around entrances its important to leave in place. This can simply be scraped off and cleaned when handwarm.

So far maybe the only disadvantage we found with the top bar hive in comparison to the framed models is that as they are better made for the bees with less parts and edges, there is less propolis to harvest!
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David Trees
House Bee


Joined: 12 Nov 2012
Posts: 13
Location: Manchester, UK

PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just read this thread and the began to read some of the info links...

Does this answer the question - How to make a tincture...

Disolve / boil it in purified water...

This is from the website > http://www.fao.org/docrep/w0076e/w0076e14.htm Which was offered in the post by StillGed
on Wed Apr 06, 2011 12:55 am

...> 5.2 Physical characteristics of propolis

The colour of propolis ranges from yellow to dark brown depending on the origin of the resins. But, even transparent propolis has been reported by Coggshall and Morse (1984).

At temperatures of 25 deg to 45 deg C propolis is a soft, pliable and very sticky substance. At less than 15 deg C, and particularly when frozen or at near freezing, it becomes hard and brittle. It will remain brittle after such treatment even at higher temperatures. Above 45 deg C it will become increasingly sticky and gummy. Typically propolis will become liquid at 60 to 70 deg C, but for some samples the melting point may be as high as 100 Deg C.

The most common solvents used for commercial extraction are ethanol (ethyl alcohol) ether, glycol and water. For chemical analysis a large variety of solvents may be used in order to extract the various fractions. Many of the bactericidal components are soluble in water or alcohol.
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